Author Archives: danteich

Senior Dogs in the Winter – Keep Them Active!

Winter may be harder on senior dogs than the balmy warmer months of summer. Sure, it is cooler and we do not have to worry about heat stroke, but arthritis is worsened by the cold, their level of exercise decreases, boredom sets in, and there are routine winter hazards. The importance of mental and physical exercise in the winter cannot be overstated – for senior and younger dogs.

Similar to humans, and as discussed a few months ago, dogs develop arthritis as they age. Sure, we give them medications and supplements to aid in comfort, but don’t forget that exercise is equally, if not more important. Walking keeps joints more nimble. When it is warm, be certain to go for routine walks and adjust your schedule some on cooler days so as to walk longer when it is warmest outside. All dogs need to be walked a minimum of three times daily to eliminate. If the walks are short due to the weather, you will need to increase exercise inside. Consider interactive tugging toys, mild games of fetch, training involving sitting and laying down, and other physically tiring activities.

Walks outside are mentally stimulating, so when indoors, find other ways to tire your dog’s brain. Consider playing a treasure hunt game where the dog is tasked with finding hidden treats or toys. Start simply by having your dog sit and stay and watch you hide a treat. When you are ready, release him to find the treat and once found, reward with a high-value treat. Once mastered you can up the difficulty by hiding things in different rooms, under different objects, around corners, in open boxes, etc. Be creative! This activity can last for hours. You can even play hide and seek with your dog, but the requires two people. Begin with both of you standing next to the dog, make him sit, and then one of you goes off and hides. Once hidden, have the other person release the pup to find you. What a wonderful prize – you!

A variation of the hunt game can involve cups with a treat placed under one cup. The challenge is for the dog to knock over the cup with the treat. This task is challenging for dogs, requires little space, and can act as a great bonding activity for both of you. Begin with two upside-down plastic cups. While the dog is watching, place a treat under one cup, wait a few seconds and then give a cue to get the treat. Perform this task 10-20 times until the dog becomes proficient. Then start alternating which cup hides the treat. If the dog chooses the incorrect cup, elevate the cup, show him the treat but do not let him have it. Replace the treat under the cup while he is watching and repeat. If mastered, place under a cup and then slide the cups to switch places. See if your dog can use all of his senses to find the treat. Remember, this is a difficult task – not all dogs can master the cup game.

Tired of picking up your dog’s toys? Teach them to place them back in the bin themselves. This game requires much patience and many sessions, but is worth the effort. Begin by teaching your dog to drop a toy, aka, “drop it.” Use traditional treats, praise, or clicker training techniques. This alone is a valuable task and is worth the investment of time. Once mastered bring out a bin and give the dog a toy, when he walks near the bin with the toy, give the command to drop-it. The closer to the bin, the better the reward. Reinforce the behavior with one toy once mastered. Eventually you can change “drop-it” to “put it away” and slowly add the number of toys to be placed in the bin. In time you can train the dog to run around the house to gather toys, awaiting a treat once they are all in the bin.

Well, it’s time to walk the dog again. You’ve been playing in the house for a few hours, but she needs to pee again. Be mindful of icy conditions – for both you and the dog. Avoid walking on heavily salted areas, if possible. Salt can become wedged between paw pads, causing discomfort. Simply clean between the paws with a paper towel, if needed. Any discomfort should resolve once the salt is removed. Don’t let your dog drink from puddles, especially when surfaces have been salted. The salt can irritate their stomachs. If your dog is happy to be outside in the cold, consider a snug-fitting dog jacket. Many varieties exist and they can help keep pup comfortable on those cold days.

May your winter be full of warm times with your dog. And as always, we are here for you.

Dan Teich, DVM
District Veterinary Hospital
(c) District Vet 2017

Thanksgiving Week Hours and Info

Happy Thanksgiving to everyone. In celebration of November, Thanksgiving, and especially Family, District Vet will be closed Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday. Dr. Hassell and crew will be seeing appointments on the following Saturday and Dr. Walker will be back on Monday, with dt,dvm returning to appointments on Tuesday. In case of an emergency, please seeContinue Reading

Canine Arthritis Management

The most common source of chronic pain in dogs is arthritis, also known as degenerative joint disease. Arthritis develops with age in many dogs, but can also begin earlier in life in dogs with hip or elbow dysplasia or as the consequence of an injury. In a select few cases, surgery may be of benefit,Continue Reading

Common Cat Myths

Common Cat Myths

Common Cat Myths Cats always land on their feet. Not quite true. When cats fall or jump, they try to right themselves and land feet first, but sometimes the fall is from too low a height, limiting the time that a cat can right itself. Many cats that fall break bones in their legs andContinue Reading

Pet Insurance – There Are Benefits

As time has progressed, I have become a fan of pet health insurance. More clients are asking about the benefits and limitations of policies and we have seen a number of clients’ pets receive care that the client would otherwise have not have been to provide without an insurance plan. It is not a panaceaContinue Reading

Leptospirosis: A real threat in the city

A Real Threat To Dogs (And Their People) When thinking of disease hazards to dogs, most people are aware of rabies, parvovirus and kennel cough, but leptospirosis should not be ignored, especially in our urban environment. Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease that may infect all domestic animals, wildlife and humans. It may cause fever, liverContinue Reading

February is for Hearts

February is for hearts and love. Happy Valentine’s Day. So let’s chat about that muscle which never stops loving your pet, it’s heart. Like your heart a dog and cat’s heart pumps blood containing oxygen and nutrients to nearly every cell in the body. The heart is an efficient pump, but when diseased or stressed,Continue Reading

2016 Cat and Dog Resolutions (For you to do)

Canine and Feline New Year’s Resolutions Get more exercise We could all use more exercise, unless of course, you run your dog several miles per day. Dogs that have more exercise tend to be healthier, have joints that last longer and behave better when left alone. The side benefit is an increase to your ownContinue Reading

Helping Pets For The Holidays

Helping Pets For The Holidays

During the holiday season, we ask ourselves what we can do for others. Help a homeless pet, but don’t limit yourself to December: help year-round. Nationwide, nearly eight million pets enter a shelter each year and half never leave. It’s heartbreaking, but you are not powerless. You can give a second chance to a dogContinue Reading

It’s Pickles!

We just like Pickles, our friends’ Dasha and Adam’s hedgehog.